PPIAC Training: learn how private investigators assist Colorado employment attorneys

If you’ve been following Denver’s Amazon bid, you already know Denver one of a twenty of mid-sized cities being considered for Amazon’s new headquarters (HQ2). If selected, the online commerce giant would bring 50,000 new high paying jobs to the city of Denver along with some notoriety.

In October, Amazon Studios chief Roy Price resigned over sexual harassment allegations. In 2015 The New York Times called Amazon a “bruising workplace” where “workers are encouraged to tear apart one another’s ideas in meetings, toil long and late (emails arrive past midnight, followed by text messages asking why they were not answered) and held to standards that the company boasts are “unreasonably high.””

Recent race discrimination, gender identification discrimination and pregnancy discrimination charges indicate the juggernaut’s local presence would

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Valentine’s Day gifts for private investigators

If your spouse or significant other is a private investigator they’re going to love anything with a detective theme. Not like we’re biased or anything but with all the Detective stories and detective inspired iconography out there, how can you not get a detective themed Valentine’s Day gift for someone you care about?

But where do you find unique Valentine’s Day gifts for private investigators? We did some investigating ourselves and here’s what we — More—

Are process servers safe? The Denver Private Investigator Blog talks process server safety with Tom Mills

DENVER – I’m sipping coffee in a beryl-blue-gray vinyl restaurant booth in Capitol Hill’s Jelly cafe as Tom Mills steps through the door. Mills’ story was brought to my attention by 9News’ Kyle Clark and Anastasiya Bolton. Colorado process servers and private investigators are reassessing safety practices and deliberating on how best to minimize risk, following the coverage, which I summarized in a November 27, 2017 blog post.

After ordering a glass of water –diabetes symptoms were prohibiting coffee– Mills thoughtfully reviews the printout of questions I’ve handed him. Before starting the interview, I want to know how he’s been doing since the November 6, 2017 Commerce City, Colorado serve that turned into a life threatening situation.

The day of the serve, Mills drove to Adams county to serve papers to Bret Martin Carbone –who also happens to be a Denver Sheriff’s deputy. Carbone lied, telling Mills he was just there to take care of the dogs, however, Mills didn’t buy it. After returning to his — More—

Are Denver process servers safe? The Denver private investigator blog talks process server safety with Tom Mills – part 1

DENVER – I’m sipping coffee in a beryl-blue-gray vinyl restaurant booth in Capitol Hill’s Jelly cafe as Tom Mills steps through the door. Mills’ story was brought to my attention by 9News’ Kyle Clark and Anastasiya Bolton. Colorado process servers and private investigators are reassessing safety practices and deliberating on how best to minimize risk, following the coverage, which I summarized in a November 27, 2017 blog post.

After ordering a glass of water –diabetes symptoms were prohibiting coffee– Mills thoughtfully reviews the printout of questions I’ve handed him. Before starting the interview, I want to know how he’s been doing since the November 6, 2017 Commerce City, Colorado serve that turned into a life threatening situation.

The day of the serve, Mills drove to Adams county to serve papers to Bret Martin Carbone –who also happens to be a Denver Sheriff’s deputy. Carbone lied, telling Mills he was just there to take care of the dogs, however, Mills didn’t buy it. After returning to — More—

Colorado’s new misconduct rule: what will the consequences be?

The day was overcast and unseasonably warm. The staff of Colorado’s Judicial Center was professional and friendly. “That’s actually a job?” the front desk receptionist asked when I handed the business card listing my title as the “Denver Private Investigator Blogger,” over the round, dark wood receptionist table.

Indeed it is, I explained and could I schedule a meeting with Attorney General, Cynthia Coffman or one of her media representatives to discuss Rule 8.4 C?

Following its September 28, 2017 announcement, I’ve only heard shocked and horrified responses from the private investigator community. Jesse Paul’s Denver Post article stated “lawyers can now engage in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit or misrepresentation when advising law enforcement officers, investigators or clients during lawful investigative activities. The Colorado Attorney General’s Office says they can’t personally conduct such subterfuge, but can supervise those actions.”

Let that sink in. Attorneys —the ones who
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Felony menacing charge issued to the Denver deputy who pulled a gun on a Colorado private investigator

By Susanna Speier
Denver Private Investigator Blogger

In a story that hopefully shed’s more light on the challenges Colorado private investigators face, 9News’ Kyle Clark and Anastasiya Bolton reported that Denver Sheriff’s deputy Bret Martin Carbone, has been charged with felony menacing after a Nov. 6 incident that occurred when Carbone pulled a gun on licensed private investigator, Tom McGhee at Carbone’s Commerce City home in Adams County.

The incident, which was also reported by The Denver Post’s Tom McGhee, occurred when licensed Colorado investigator Tom Mills knocked on Carbone’s door. The earbud wearing, NASA t-shirt clad man who opened the door said his name was “John” and he was just at the house to look after the dogs. That was a lie.

Sensing he smelled a rat, Mills returned to his car and used Facebook to verify that the earbud wearing, NASA t-shirt clad guy at the door was not

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Private investigators aren’t buying black cube’s apology

On November 9th we covered Ronan Farrow’s New Yorker story revealing Harvey Weinstein’s connection to the Israeli private investigative agency, Black Cube. A Black Cube board member had just apologized and promised to donate money earned from working on the Weinstein case to women’s organizations. So we asked private investigators what they thought of Black Cube’s apology, expecting to gather a range of reactions. Here’s what — More—